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« Net Neutrality: It Matters | Main | BJI: Good/Bad Combo Edition »

04 May 2006

Discontinued Whine

Whine Have you ever discovered a new, old favorite hanging out in the closeout rack of your local wine shop? 

Just last week I noticed a few 'last call' bottles of Chateau Montelena's Potter Valley Riesling (2000, $20).  I'm always game for Riesling from lesser known appellations, so I took it home.  I must say, this wine was one of the most character-full American Rieslings I've ever sampled.  It was deep, thick gold in color.  I was immediately reminded of a German Spätlese.  Montelena's Riesling offered up an intriguing scent combination of honeyed pear and seriously mature earthiness.  As I prepared to take a sip, my taste buds braced themselves for rich, thick late harvest-like wine.  The wine was indeed thick and viscous.  Yet it was dry, albeit with slightly low acidity.  Still, I found this to be a very unique expression of Riesling.  I wanted more.  Yet, that is all there was.

I say, "was," because this wine is no longer offered (at least not in a retail shop).  Damn.

And this isn't the first time I've happened upon a tasty wine, which, after I've enjoyed it and want more, I come to find out that it has been discontinued.  For example, a while back, I found Chappellet's Sangiovese to be a comely red wine.  "More please." I said.  However, the Chappellet's said, "Sorry, we no longer produce a single-varietal Sangiovese."  Double damn.

The question of the day is this:  What wine have you fallen in love with; only to find out that it is no longer produced?

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Comments

Trish

The Ortman Rose of syrah was my favorite, and while it's still being produced, they've changed it beyond recognition. They tood this perfect wine and blended in viognier. Why? I don't know. It's dead to me!

beau

Trish - perhaps they were thinking of making a traditional nothern Rhone red (which often contains a small percentage of Vio). Then when the result came out, someone in the winery thought, "Eh not so good. Let's add more Viognier and make it a blush!"

JD

Sorry I'm late to this conversation, but I had to add my two cents. Cline Mourvedre. I enjoyed it for a couple of years about 10 years ago -- very earthy and peppery for just $10. An then, poof, gone. Sigh.

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